Hand sanitizers

From: kevinutley@comcast.net <kevinutley@comcast.net>
Subject: Hand sanitizers
To: escostudyclub@yahoo.com
Date: Monday, January 24, 2011, 10:49 AM

I started using handsanitizing gel instead of handwashing a few months ago.  I find that it allows me to glove up much more quickly and move through my day.  I still wash if there is visible soil on my hands (usually after soldering something in the lab).  Anyone aware of any studies that compare the use of hand sanitizers instead of hand washing?  How many of you are using hand sanitizers?

Kevin C. Utley
Cordova, TN

2 responses to “Hand sanitizers

  1. By Regina Bailey, About.com Guide

    Hand Sanitizers vs. Soap and Water

    Antibacterial hand sanitizers are marketed to the public as an effective way to “wash one’s hands” when traditional soap and water are not available. These “waterless” products are particularly popular with parents of small children. Manufacturers of hand sanitizers claim that the sanitizers kill 99.9 percent of germs. Since you naturally use hand sanitizers to cleanse your hands, the assumption is that 99.9 percent of harmful germs are killed by the sanitizers. Recent research suggests that this is not the case.

    How do hand sanitizers work?

    Hand sanitizers work by stripping away the outer layer of oil on the skin. This usually prevents bacteria present in the body from coming to the surface of the hand. However, these bacteria that are normally present in the body are generally not the kinds of bacteria that will make us sick. In a review of the research, Barbara Almanza, an associate professor at Purdue University who teaches safe sanitation practices to workers, came to an interesting conclusion. She notes that the research shows that hand sanitizers do not significantly reduce the number of bacteria on the hand and in some cases may potentially increase the amount of bacteria on the hand. So the question arises, how can the manufacturers make the 99.9 percent claim?

    How can the manufacturers make the 99.9 percent claim?

    The manufacturers of the products test the products on inanimate surfaces hence they are able to derive the claims of 99.9 percent of bacteria killed. If the products were fully tested on hands, there would no doubt be different results. Since there is inherent complexity in the human hand, testing hands would definitely be more difficult. Using surfaces with controlled variables is an easier way to obtain some type of consistency in the results. But as we are all aware, everyday life is not as consistent.
    Hand Sanitizers vs. Soap and Water

    Interestingly enough, the Food and Drug Administration, in regards to regulations concerning proper procedures for food services, recommends that hand sanitizers not be used in place of soap and water but only as an adjunct.

    Likewise, Almanza recommends that to properly sanitize the hands, soap and water should be used. A hand sanitizer can not and should not take the place of proper cleansing procedures with soap and water.
    What about antibacterial soaps?

    Research on the use of antibacterial soaps has shown that plain soaps are just as effective as antibacterial soaps in reducing bacteria related illnesses. In fact, using consumer antibacterial soap products may increase bacterial resistance to antibiotics in some bacteria. These conclusions only apply to consumer antibacterial soaps and not to those used in hospitals or other clinical areas.

    Other studies suggest that ultra-clean environments and the persistent use of antibacterial soaps and hand sanitizers may inhibit proper immune system development in children. This is because inflammatory systems require greater exposure to common germs for proper development.

  2. Hi Kevin:

    We have been using the hand sanitizers for about 8-10 years. I forget exactly when, but we started when our local hospital moved from soap and water to hand sanitizers. It is much easier on our hands and we no longer see the rashes around our wrists in combination with changing gloves. I made the assumption that the hospital had already done due diligence on this one, and since we treated so many of the employees of the local hospital, they were very comfortable with this move.

    The only place we have soap is in the bathrooms. We also have a hand sanitizer the front check-in station. We started doing this about 3 years ago for patients to use after using the mouse to check-in. That was greatly appreciated from day one and impressed our parents.

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